Use of “Adverb of Manner-Hard”: Meaning with examples

Definition of Adverb of Manner

Adverb of manner is an adverb that described how and in what manner the action of a verb takes place. Such as quickly, slowly, badly, etc.

How to use the Irregular adverb of Manner- Hard

As you may know, Adverbs of Manner describe how an action is done. And, today’s word, “hard” is an irregular Adverb of Manner. 

Unlike other words, the spelling of Irregular Adverbs of Manner doesn’t change when used to describe an action. And so, it’s incorrect to say “I work hardly,” although adding ly to “hard” seems like the correct way to conjugate the word. It’s worth noting that, hardly is an Adverb of Frequency, not Manner. It means to do something rarely. 

As for using the Adjective of Manner “hard” in a sentence correctly, it can be placed after any Verb to state that the person doing the action is putting the most effort in. For example, you can “play ball,” or “play ball hard.” A team member who “plays ball hard” is doing their best. 

We Like Bands that Play Hard

Getting to the theme of this article, this writer likes bands that “play hard,” to borrow a line from David Bowie’s Rebel Rebel. A band that “plays it hard (as the song goes)” puts all their energy into performing on stage. 

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Modal Verbs of Probability- Meaning, Use, And Practice Exercises.

What are Modal Verbs?

Modal Verbs are Verbs of probability. They express a guess at outcomes. Modal Verbs include:

“must, might, may, could” and “can’t”

Cinderella may find her prince.

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For example: 

“Cinderella may find her prince.” 

Is a guess at the likelihood of Cinderella, the mistreated stepdaughter, meeting and marrying Prince Charming. 

The Modal Verb “may” expresses a greater degree of certainty than “might,” although neither are quantified into exact numbers. 

Alternatively, someone may say:

“Cinderella might find her prince.” 

Or

“Cinderella could find her prince.” 

which expresses little belief in a positive outcome. 

And finally, you may hear someone say:

“Cinderella can’t find her prince.”

This means that there’s no likelihood of her meeting and marrying Prince Charming. 

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The Possessive Form: Definition, meaning with examples

Meaning of the Possessive form

The Possessive Form demonstrates the relationship between two or more objects (physical things, not sentence endings). These sentences are loaded with Nouns, Proper Nouns, and Pronouns. And so, it’s essential to understand the difference between a Proper Noun and a Pronoun to construct Possessive Form sentences. 

Pronouns take the place of a Noun. They are found in a sentence’s Subject as words like “his, her, she” and “theirs.” But, Proper Nouns are specific, capitalized nouns. They may be something like Dr. Smith.  

Let’s look at some Possessive Form sentences:

“Dr. Smith’s cat is at Eric’s house” demonstrates a relationship between “Dr. Smith’s cat” and Eric’s house,” our two Possessive Nouns. And so, our Verb Phrase is “is at.”

Here’s another example of a Possessive Form Sentence: 

“Sarah’s dog is by the station’s door.”

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What are Adjectives? Learn the Dictionary meaning with Examples and practice sentences.

Hey readers! Or should I say, hey curious readers! What did I just do? I threw an adjective in the same sentence. Which word was an adjective? If you guessed the word “curious”, you got it right! The word “curious” is used as an adjective. Most of us use adjectives when we speak, without realizing we just used them. Let’s understand what an adjective is.

Definition of Adjectives:

An adjective is a part of speech. Adjectives are words that describe a noun. We use them in sentences to give a noun a description. Such as just saying a house, we can describe the house as, “A large house”. Adjectives are our way of telling people what things around us are like.

The simple way to check if a sentence has an adjective, is to just question yourself, do the sentence you read or hear describe a person, place, animal, thing, or idea? If it does, then the describing word is an adjective. 

Adjective examples in sentences:

  • Sheena is wearing a soft green dress.
  • Addie is wearing a square glass.
  • Ryo is a brave boy.
  • The tiger is a ferocious animal.
  • This museum has ancient artifacts.

Let’s practice a few sentences:

Try filling in the blanks with adjective/adjectives.

  1. The room was filled with ………………balloons. (colorful/ lot of/ no)
  2. The party was filled with …………….people. (noisy/ lot of/ less)
  3. Sam got me a bag of ……………….apples. ( red/ one/ more)
  4. The teacher sat on a ………….chair. (wooden/ teacher’s)
  5. It is a ……………..morning. (blue/foggy/best)

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Eigooo supports you with a 24/7 chat service with real teachers.

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  • The teacher will make immediate corrections to your messages.
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Idioms: Definition, meaning, and examples.

Definition of an Idiom

Idioms are a group of words that signifies/ has a meaning together as a set phrase or is usually symbolic to an expression. It does not have a direct meaning of words individually used.

For example, the idiom, “See red” does not mean a person sees anything that is red in color, it is just symbolic to signify anger. This signifies that the person is very angry.

5 Popular Idioms with Examples

  1. Once in a blue moon: A rare occurrence. Example: My boss considers appraisals once in a blue moon.
  2. On cloud nine: To be ecstatic or joyful.  Example: I was on cloud nine with my promotion in hand.
  3. Hand in glove: To be closely associated with or in collaboration with someone for completing an action. Example: The team is working hand in glove with other departments to achieve company sales targets.
  4. Flesh and blood: Refers a relation or direct family members, to be directly related to another having the same DNA. Example: Shaina couldn’t punish her sons for their actions as they were her own flesh and blood
  5. Second hand: Not of original source, not new. Example: It is a wise idea to buy a renewed or a second-hand gadget if in a good condition.

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Definition of Proper Nouns and Common Nouns

Proper Noun

This is a word that substitutes a Noun. It is the name of a person, a place, an animal, or a thing. A proper noun is used to identify a single person, place, animal, or thing specifically.

Examples of Proper Noun

  • Harry likes to Draw
  • London is one of the most beautiful countries I have traveled to
  • Bruno, my dog loves to bask in the sun.

Common Noun

 Is the generic name of a class or section of people, animals, or things. It does not specify anything in particular but speaks of a group or any class of beings or things 

Examples of Common Noun

  • Teachers are the most respected professionals globally
  • The cheetah is the world’s fastest land animal.
  • The Peregrine Falcon is the fastest bird, in fact, it is the fastest animal on the planet.

Nouns: Abstract noun and Collective noun with examples.

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Definition and Meaning of the Idiom Red flag with examples.

Definition of the Idiom Red flag

Is a sign of warning. It is to draw attention to any issue that needs immediate attention. Anything that indicates a problem or a danger if not sorted immediately.

Examples of sentences using the idiom “Red Flag”

  • The gap in Jack’s employment history was a red flag to the employers.
  • We avoided traveling after the meteorologist issued a red flag for an expected cyclone
  • The talk about raising taxes in the USA was a red flag to many voters 
  • Limiting reservations of job opportunities for the top scorers was a red flag to those who did score well.

Red Flag (Idiom) Definition, meaning with Examples.

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A figure of Speech: Oxymoron

Definition and Meaning of an Oxymoron

“Oxymorons” have been used since the heyday of Greek poetry, The Greco-Roman Period. 

They are a figure of speech in which seemingly contradictory concepts are smashed together, and a literary device that describes those contradictory bits of life, like a bittersweet moment. 

I Hope This Blog Doesn’t Go Down Like a Lead Balloon

As I write this blog, I hope it doesn’t go down like a lead balloon, fail to be engaging, or communicate my point. 

This “oxymoron” is as fun as “jumbo shrimp.” The images it brings to mind are exceedingly funny. It could even be applied to historic events like the crash of the Zeppelin.

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Meaning and use of Interrogative Sentence: Who

Definition of Interrogative Sentences

Interrogative Sentence is used to ask questions. And, the most common interrogative words, in alphabetical order, are:

WhatWhenWhereWhetherWhich
WhoWhomWhoseWhyHow

These words are sometimes called “wh-words” because most of them begin with wh. “Who,” a wh-word is our interrogative word of the day. 

“Who,” pronounced /ho͞o/, is a Pronoun that means what or which person or people, among other things. 

Who is Behind the Mask

For example, you may go to a Halloween party and hear a native English speaker ask, “Who is  behind the mask?” This may even be something you’ve wondered about Batman or the anime character Tuxedo Mask. By asking this, the speaker wants to know who is wearing the mask. Sometimes costumes conceal identity. 

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Know about Modal Verbs of Probability Present – Can’t

Meaning of Modal Verbs

Modal Verbs are statements of probability. Modal Verbs express a belief in an outcome. The Modal Verb “can’t,” the topic of today’s lesson, expresses that something is most likely untrue.

When it comes to the Modal Verbs, “can’t” is usually used with “be” to speak of disbelief.

What Alva said can’t be true

For example: 

When Alva said he had invented electric light, nobody believed him. The people said, “this can’t be true, it’s the fire that lights the home.”

Those who heard Alva speak believed that he was lying and so they showed their disbelief by saying “this can’t be true.” Yet, it was true, Thomas Alva Edison invented the light bulb.

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