Phrases

A phrase is a few words put together to express a particular meaning in a sentence. Learn to use the right phrases in English to be able to express yourself better with it.

Learn about Separable Phrasal Verbs – Advanced

We have already covered Separable Phrasal Verbs in another article. They are: Verb + Object + Preposition

They are based on simple Phrasal Verbs:

Verb + Preposition

An example of a Separable Phrasal Verb is “turn down,” the topic of today’s lesson.

Separable Phrasal Verbs

Turn The Volume Down

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Learn about Separable Phrasal Verbs – Basics

Scat Singing Cheers me up

What is Scat Singing, you may ask? In Jazz, an American style of music, Scat Singing is the use of nonsense words like “zippity zippity zippity zam za zim” to make improvised melodies. 

How do nonsense words relate to learning English? In our case, these sounds cheer the Speaker up, which brings us to Phrasal Verbs – “cheer up” is a Phrasal Verb. 

In general, Phrasal Verbs are a Verb + Preposition combination, like “cheer up.” But, there’s another kind of Phrasal Verb too, the Separable Phrasal Verb. 

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Learn about forming Polite Imperatives

Please turn down the radio 

The Imperative is used to command, request, or forbid (tell others not to do things that may harm them). But, Imperative Sentences don’t come across all that polite. In fact, Imperative Sentences can sometimes be seen as rude by the listener.

However, the speaker can use “please” to form a Polite Imperative. 

To form a Polite Imperative, place the word “please” at the beginning or end of a sentence. For example, a speaker may say:

“Turn down the radio, please.” 

The above sentence is a polite way to request the listener to lower the radio’s volume. The speaker may also say: 

“Please turn down the radio.” 

Both Polite Imperative Sentences are correct. And, both mean the same thing. 

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What is a phrasal verb “Get away”?

A phrasal verb, such as “get away”, contains two or more words, a verb along with other elements of language. While listening to a native English speaker, you will encounter one of these three Phrasal Verb linguistic structures (word orders):

     Verb + Adverb (eg break down)

     Verb + Preposition (eg see to)

     Verb + Adverb + Preposition (eg look down on)

The Adverbs related to these structures (syntaxes) are referred to as Adverbs of Manner. They are always placed after the Verb. 

A few common examples of the Adverb + Verb structure are speaking softly, did well, and get away (the subject of today’s lesson). 

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What is a phrasal verb “Get up”?

A phrasal verb, such as to ‘get up’,  contains two or more words, a verb along with other elements of language. While listening to a native English speaker, you will encounter one of these three Phrasal Verb linguistic structures (word orders):

     Verb + Adverb (example: break down)

     Verb + Preposition (example: see to)

     Verb + Adverb + Preposition (example look down on)

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