Idioms

An idiom is a group of words or a phrase that is used artistically to express oneself. It is when we do not try to take out direct meanings of a single word but express them by a group of words in a figurative manner. Know how to express yourself more artistically in English by using Idioms,

Idioms with picture: a picture paints a thousand words

It’s true, a picture does paint a thousand words. One doesn’t even have to be an Essayist to jot a thousand words upon encountering an old photograph or painting. Each image contains context and sub-context: the immediately visible that which one must dig to notice. 

Here’s an example: Ren went into a junk shop. While browsing the antiques, she stumbled upon an old picture of Tokyo. Ren immediately noticed the difference in clothing, landscape, vehicles…The picture barely resembled the modern neon-filled Tokyo. While looking at the picture Ren said to herself, “This picture paints a thousand words.” And although the photograph was an antique, it was only a few Yen. She fell in love with it, bought it on the spot, took it home, framed it, and now it hangs in Ren’s den.

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Examples of a picture paints a thousand words

I took a photo from my balcony to show my friends. A picture paints a thousand words after all. 

I find it easier to follow instructions with pictures rather than just text as a picture paints a thousand words. 

  1. Let’s practice 

Q1: Try making your own sentence.

Q2: Do you feel that old photographs from your childhood paint a thousand words? Why or why not?  

Q3: What picture, according to you, paints a thousand words? Why? 

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Idioms with picture: Pretty as a picture

Today, our lesson is about one of my favorite subjects: idioms.

Idioms are seemingly nonsensical groupings of words.  However, they aren’t as they seem. In fact, these phrases are cram-packed with meaning! Their meaning evolved through usage, rather than the entries of lexicographers, Grammarians who decide which words are placed in the dictionary and what they mean.

Idiom of the day: pretty as a picture. 

This saying came about during the Victorian Era, the 1800s. It was even used by Mark Twain. In the book A Connecticut Yankee in King Author’s Court, Twain describes a character as “pretty as a picture.” Despite the noted hubbub, this phrase literally means attractive, in fact, there’s not much else to it. 

You may encounter a native English speaker saying “She’s as pretty as a picture.” The speaker is telling the listener that the person in question is beautiful. 

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Idioms with body parts: speak your mind

Idioms are a fun way to express ourselves. These sayings add color and meaning to any conversation. 

We are continuing our discussion of idioms related to parts of the body. Recently, we explored the relationship between feet and bills through the idiom “foot the bill,” but today our phrase is “speak your mind.” 

Someone who speaks their mind is outspoken. Often, they are not very popular because they say things that offend others, their words may be hateful or blunt. 

For example, “people who speak their minds aren’t well-liked”. By saying this, the speaker is telling the listener that those who always reveal their true thoughts are disliked. You may also say “they tell it how it is,” both phrases possess the same meaning.

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Idioms with body parts: foot the bill

Most languages have idioms, English and Chinese are well known for these cryptic yet meaningful word groupings. 

Most interestingly, idioms are groupings of words whose meaning can’t be deduced through logic; they are nonsensical. These phrases have evolved through use rather than the entries of lexicographers (individuals who decide which words go into the dictionary and what they mean). 

These compact phrases pack a lot of punch. They are heavy with regional connotations and whimsy. Indeed, these sayings make language fun!

Using the idiom foot the bill

How can I use the idiom foot the bill in a full sentence?

You may even encounter a native speaker using the idiom “foot the bill.” This saying, counter-intuitively, has nothing to do with feet. By saying this, the speaker is stating that they will pay the bill. For example, “William often dines with us, but he never foots the bill”. Simply, he never pays. 

An image representing the above statement

Moreover, the person who foots the bill pays the entire bill. The idiom is most often used with dining but can be applied to anything. 

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What is the idiom “see red’?

Many languages, such as Japanese, French, and Arabic, have idioms, but what are they? Simply put, an idiom is a group of words that has a meaning that can’t be deduced through logic.

Interestingly, an idiom’s meaning has been established by usage rather than entries in a dictionary. And so, if you were to look up the words one by one in a dictionary, you wouldn’t gain any clarity on the meaning of the sentence.

The English language has idioms for a wide range of phenomena. It even has one that fits the above situation, “ I searched the dictionary, but it didn’t shed any light on my confusion.”

Today’s lesson is about the idiom “seeing red.” A person who says “I see red” doesn’t literally see the color red, they’re angry.

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What is an idiom – “Red Flag”?

Many languages have idioms. Chinese and English are well known for these colorful phrases. So, what is an idiom? An idiom is a group of words for which the meaning can’t be deduced through logic.

An idiom’s meaning can’t be found in a dictionary. Interestingly, the meaning of these phrases has been established by usage rather than the words within them. So, if you were to look up the words one by one in a dictionary, you wouldn’t gain any clarity on the meaning of the sentence. You may even encounter a native speaker using an idiom to describe the above situation. They might say, “I searched the dictionary, but it didn’t shed any light on my confusion.”

Again, idioms are imaginative but not necessarily logical. Moreover, they can be amusing and demonstrate a culture’s view of an idea or behavior. Here are a couple of examples:

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