Rainbow (color)Idioms: Meaning with examples

Meaning of Rainbow idioms?

Native speakers often use idioms in conversation, so knowing English idioms with their meanings would give English learners an extra tool to express themselves. Using English color idioms or idioms rainbow can always be fun.

English idioms are easier to learn and remember if we put them into groups. Let us look at a few examples of idioms about rainbows and colors. 

Popular Color Idioms that will Improve Your English Fluency

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Verb Tenses: How to use them with examples.

Tenses: Types, meaning and examples

Verbs come in three tenses: past, present, and future, They are further subdivided into 12 categories.

What are the 12 Tenses in English and why are they important?

Verb tenses in English are broadly divided into the past, present, and future. In English grammar, tenses are used to indicate when an action happened and if it is still going on or finished. The tense of a verb is used to refer to time while communicating in English.

There are 12 tenses in the English language. Namely:

  1. Simple present
  2. Present continuous
  3. Present perfect
  4. Present perfect continuous
  5. Simple past
  6. Past continuous
  7. Past perfect
  8. Past perfect continuous
  9. Simple future
  10. Future continuous
  11. Future perfect
  12. Future perfect continuous
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Red Flag (Idiom) Definition, meaning with Examples.

What does a red flag (idiom) mean?

The Idiom “Red flag” is often used to signify danger. “Red flag,” as a Noun, is a warning of danger. For example, “His actions raised a red flag”. By saying this, the speaker is telling the listener that the man in question was doing something suspicious, troubles could arise from his actions.

As a Verb, the phrase also signals danger. When used in Verb form, you may encounter the gerund or past tense of the word, such as:

  • Red-flagging
  • Red-flagged

Examples of the idiom “red flag”

  • Fever is the body’s red flag.
  • Teachers always check for red flags such as tardiness and absences.
  • Feeling of anxiety, depression is often considered as the mind’s Red flag.
  • Employers consider a constant shift in jobs as a red flag.
  • She saw a red flag when the boss asked her for personal favors.

Color Idiom

Often, the English language uses idioms that invoke color imagery, like, I feel blue, in the pink, red flag, etc. These figures of speech are used because colors have a strong association with emotions. For example, “Bulls (male cows) are color blind, but a matador (bullfighter), uses a red flag to provoke the animal”. Why use a red rag to anger a colorblind bull?

An image representing the idiom “Red Flag”
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Idioms About Change: Change of Heart

Mary Had a Change of Heart and Set Her Little Lamb Free

As you know, you can’t change your heart, you were born with it. But, the English idiom “change of heart” implies that you can. 

The idiom “change of heart” doesn’t literally mean that you can swap one organ with another. It means that you can change your mind, usually after long consideration. 

You may know the Nursery Rhyme Mary Had a Little Lamb. Taking from that, I have an example of the idiom “change of heart” to share: 

Mary had a little lamb. Mary loved her little lamb. But, one day she had a change of heart and decided it was time to set the little lamb free. For she knew that to love something is to let it go. If it returns, it loves you.

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Know about Modal Verbs of Probability Present – Can’t

What Alva said can’t be true

Modal Verbs are statements of probability. Modal Verbs express a belief in an outcome. The Modal Verb “can’t,” the topic of today’s lesson, expresses that something is most likely untrue.

When it comes to the Modal Verbs, “can’t” is usually used with “be” to speak of disbelief.

For example: 

When Alva said he had invented electric light, nobody believed him. The people said, “this can’t be true, it’s the fire that lights the home.”

Those who heard Alva speak believed that he was lying and so they showed their disbelief by saying “this can’t be true.” Yet, it was true, Thomas Alva Edison invented the light bulb.

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Know Modal Verbs of Probability Present

Cinderella May Find Her Prince

Modal Verbs are Verbs of probability. They express a guess at outcomes. Modal Verbs include:

“must, might, may, could” and “can’t”

For example: 

“Cinderella may find her prince.” 

Is a guess at the likelihood of Cinderella, the mistreated stepdaughter, meeting and marrying Prince Charming. 

The Modal Verb “may” expresses a greater degree of certainty than “might,” although neither are quantified into exact numbers. 

Alternatively, someone may say:

“Cinderella might find her prince.” 

Or

“Cinderella could find her prince.” 

which expresses little belief in a positive outcome. 

And finally, you may hear someone say:

“Cinderella can’t find her prince.”

This means that there’s no likelihood of her meeting and marrying Prince Charming. 

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Figures of Speech: Metaphors

Adam is a walking encyclopedia

Figures of Speech, like idioms, have evolved through usage, rather than the work of Lexicographers, those who decide what goes in the dictionary. But unlike idioms, the meaning of the Figures of Speech known as metaphors can be deduced through logic. 

Figures of Speech fall into many categories, they can be similes, hyperbole and metaphors.

Metaphors, the language of poets, are Figure of Speech that describes an object or action in a way that isn’t exactly true. However, these untruths help to describe the object or actions by comparing them to something else. For example, you may hear a native English speaker say:

“Adam is a walking encyclopedia of music.” 

Upon hearing this Metaphor, you would be correct to assume that Adam isn’t literally a collection of books that give information on many subjects. Adam is simply knowledgeable about music. 

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Know about Figures of Speech

Ophelia is my guardian angel

Figures of Speech are phrases that have a different meaning from their literal definition. These are somewhat like but differ from Idioms. 

On one hand, a Figure of Speech is nonliteral and imaginative language but can be understood by someone who isn’t familiar with that particular Figure of Speech. On the other hand, it’s impossible to understand an idiom without being familiar with that particular idiom. 

In general, Figures of Speech can be metaphors or similes but can fall into other categories as well. Figures of Speech are designed to make comparisons. This is achieved by devices such as alliteration (the repetition of certain sounds) or exaggeration, known as hyperbole. This creates a dramatic effect.

Alliteration in figurative language is fun. For example, you may hear a native English speaker say:

“I bought a box of bricks.” 

The repetitive b sound makes the phrase have a nice ring to it. Not just is the saying alliteration, it’s hyperbolic. 

Hyperbole, one of my favorite types of figurative speech, exaggerates an attribute of something, calling attention to it. In the above example, I didn’t literally buy “a box of bricks.” I bought a faulty product. I called the product “a box of bricks” because it didn’t work correctly. You, in your lifetime, have probably bought “a box of bricks” too, perhaps you purchased a faulty phone. 

Here’s another example of hyperbole: 

“Ophelia is my guardian angel.”

In reality, Ophelia isn’t a mythical creature. But she helps me when I’m in need, and so, I used this hyperbole when discussing her. 

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Gerunds after Prepositions

Mowing the lawn is no fun

Interestingly, Gerund is pronounced JEH-ruhnd. It’s like GIF or Giraffe. I know there’s a debate about the pronunciation of GIF, but the creator, Steve Wilhite, says that it’s said with a soft j

Simply, a Gerund is a Noun acting as a Verb. A few examples include “going, hearing,” and “having.” We make a Gerund by adding ing to the end of a Verb. 

Gerunds may be alone or with other words to form a Gerund Phrase. Altogether, this phrase behaves like a single Noun.

Much like Nouns and Noun Phrases, Gerunds and Gerund Phrases can be found in the Object, Subject, or Predicate Nominative portions of a sentence (In regards to SVO). And so, Gerunds can act in any way an ordinary Noun can. 

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Gerunds For Beginners

Avoid Staring at the Sun 

This is our second installment of discussing Gerund. The gerund is a noun formed from a verb. Simply put, we create Gerunds by adding ing to the end of a Verb. Some examples of Gerunds include “running, staying,” and “buying.” 

Gerunds are used after certain Verbs, like “enjoy, avoid, finish, suggest,” and “keep.” Below are some examples of the Gerund in action. 

Gerunds may appear alone or with other words to form a Gerund Phrase. Collectively, this phrase behaves like a single noun.

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